Buy Workers' Compensation for Manufacturing & Food Production

Workers’ compensation premiums are calculated, in part, by the kinds of work performed. Many businesses have multiple functions performed by different kinds of employees - others have just a few people who wear many different hats. It’s important to classify employees accurately - based on what they spend the majority of their time doing - because this could alter your premium dramatically.

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What to Know

  • Because it is very physically demanding and involves heavy machinery, manufacturing jobs are higher risk compared to other industries.
  • The nature of your business, number of employees being covered and past coverage and claims are all factors in how much your premium will cost. Learn more about workers' comp insurance rates >>

Potential Hazards

  • Large, heavy equipment, noisy machines, dangerous tools and working at heights can all be hazardous in manufacturing work environments.
  • Workers are at risk of falling, being struck by an object, getting clothing or limbs caught in machinery, eye injury, hearing damage and slip-and-fall injuries.
  • Some jobs in this industry can be very physically demanding, involving heavy lifting or pulling and putting workers at higher risk for sprains, strains and repetitive stress injuries.
  • Working at heights above 15 feet will make your business a greater risk.

About Work Class Codes

Many businesses have several work class codes that describe what their employees do. It’s important to classify each group of employees accurately because it could alter your premium dramatically.

Management of Companies & Enterprises Work Class Codes

  • Bank holding company 
  • Other holding company

Other Tips

If you employ workers in multiple states or your employees are temporarily working out-of-state, you need to purchase insurance for all the states where your workers are located, according to each state’s laws.

The nature of your business, number of employees being covered and past coverage and claims are all factors in how much your premium will cost.

Learn more about workers’ comp insurance rates >>

Here's What You Need to Get Started

To buy workers compensation insurance, you need to request a quote from a licensed insurance agent and provide some details about your business.

Here’s what to have in front of you:

  • Number of employees in each class code.
  • Total payroll for all employees. You may be able to exclude yourself if you don't wish to be covered under the policy. 
  • Federal ID Number. If you are a sole proprietor, you can use your Social Security Number.
  • Copy of your workers comp insurance policy, if you've had coverage or claims in the past few years. If you know your company's experience mod, please have your experience mod rating sheet or policy in front of you. Otherwise, you will be assigned a default rating of 1.0.

The information on this page has been interpreted and summarized for your convenience. Please consult your state's governing authority for the most current and complete legislation.